Orillia: (705) 325-1765   Barrie: (705) 739-6725

Surprising links Between Women’s Oral Health And Whole Body Health

https://i2.wp.com/www.upwork.com/messages/files/room_51a1a1da1768cfd1b444b968a2f09531/1609708f-7e93-4cb6-b34b-43a5fd2009ea/3%20women%20multiple%20ages.png?w=960&ssl=1     Modern society embraces the beauty of all women regardless of shape or skin color: healthy is the new beautiful. Unfortunately, not many understand the importance of oral health and the influence it plays on women’s general well-being. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence that connects oral health and general health. Research has suggested that gum disease could lead to more serious health issues such as premature birth defects during pregnancy, stroke or heart disease.
Protecting your teeth might be more important than you think—and not just for aesthetic reasons like white teeth and a bright smile! When a woman takes proper care of her teeth it is an investment in her future—a way of maintaining the health of her body or perhaps even the health of an unborn child. “There are a number of dental factors which effect the body,” relates Dr. Adam Tan of Georgian Dental.

Healthy is the new beautiful.

The hormonal fluctuations that come during different stages of women’s lives have a greater effect on oral health than is commonly understood. Puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause can all cause occurrences of the following at different degrees of severity:

  • dry mouth
  • changes in taste
  • cold sores
  • canker soresgum disease
  • gum disease

When not handled appropriately, these issues can lead to:

  •  heart disease
  • stroke
  • pregnancy complications

So how does the condition of the mouth affect the wellbeing of the body exactly? A lack of proper dental hygiene can cause inflammation of the gums. When bacteria build up on teeth, gums are prone to infection. This alerts the immune system to attack the affected areas which causes gums to become inflamed and irritated. Unless the infection is brought under control this will continue and chemicals will eat away at the gums and the underlying bone structure that hold teeth in place. Not only does this result in severe gum disease known as periodontitis, but it also causes problems in the rest of the body.
Diabetes is a common problem that is strongly linked to periodontitis. Among diseases caused by gum complications, diabetes may have the strongest correlation. Inflammation in the mouth weakens the body’s ability to control blood sugar. Severe periodontitis increases the risk of decreased insulin production. When sugars in the body are not properly converted to energy, this causes diabetes.
According to studies, up to 91 percent of patients with heart disease have periodontitis, compared to only 66 percent of people without heart disease. Some of the common risk factors for both are smoking, having an unhealthy diet, and carrying excess body weight. It is believed that periodontitis has a direct role in raising the risk for heart disease, as well.
Researchers are also looking into cases of infection and inflammation that are believed to have interfered with fetus development in the womb. The pregnancy gestation period causes hormonal changes inside a woman’s body that increase the risk of periodontitis. In addition, gingivitis during pregnancy – identifiable by the sight of red, inflamed and bleeding gums – is common as well. and if left untreated, it increases the chances of premature delivery. Always check oral health before and after pregnancy to prevent issues pre and post birth.
Other common issues associated with woman’s dental health:

  • Gums may swell and bleed before menstruation. Some women suffer from the formation of canker sores during this time of their cycle. Once the period arrives, these problems often disappear.
  • Taking oral birth control such as the pill can cause inflamed gums, a common side effect
  • During menopause, red or inflamed gums, oral pain and discomfort, burning sensations, altered taste, and dry mouth are all common consequences.

Taking care of dental health is paramount to a woman’s general health and well-being. So floss, brush and go to the dentist. Don’t take oral health for granted!
At Georgian Dental we understand the links between good oral health and your entire well-being. Consequently, our practice is one of holistic dental care for whole health dentistry. Whether you are seeking an Orillia dentist or a Barrie dentist, we can be of service. Call today and learn more about methods and strategies we use in holistic oral care.

Georgian Dental Orillia: (705)-325-1765
Georgian Dental Barrie: (705)-739-6725

Resource links

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/oral-health-the-mouth-body-connection
https://www.durham.ca/departments/health/dental/womensWellness.pdf

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